Tag Archives: television

Groundpuck Day

Today is January 1st, New Year’s Day, and for puckheads, that can only mean one thing:

The Flyers are still in last place.

Well, ahem, yes, that’s technically true, but for the majority of hockey fans out there, the first day of the year has come to mean another installment of the NHL’s best–and, weirdly, worst–idea in a long time: the Winter Classic.

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The 2018 Winter Classic at Citi Field: I feel like I’ve been here before…

The outdoor game has been a big hit for the league, but there have always been minor issues with the presentation of the game–and, apparently, folks are beginning to notice that fact. A recent video made the rounds on the web suggesting that maybe, just maybe, there might be better places to play the Winter Classic than in football and baseball stadiums that are in no way designed to host hockey games.

Gee, if only someone had had that idea sooner. Oh, wait… Continue reading Groundpuck Day

Monday Spites Football

It’s halftime of the Kings-Warriors game as I write this. Tonight’s Dubs game represents the fourth out of the last five Mondays to see the defending NBA champions play a game. The three most recent of those games were home games for the Warriors, meaning they had at least some say in the scheduling of those games; start times for sure, if not the actual dates.

A quick look forward at the schedule shows that the Warriors will also be playing each of the next four Mondays; that is to say, each Monday in December, including the Christmas day matchup against the Cavaliers. That means the team will be playing on all but one Monday in November and December.

So what? So this: the Warriors, and a lot of other teams in leagues other than the NFL, almost never used to play on Monday nights in November and December. This scheduling intrusion indicates that the assault on the NFL’s elevated status continues apace. It means, quite simply, that no one is afraid of the NFL anymore. Continue reading Monday Spites Football

The Sports TV Mystery Machine

The DFR has been on a bit of an Extendo-Break lately–maybe more like an Extendo-Nap, to be honest–so I’ve been letting any number of things that have been percolating through the sports world slide on past without comment.


Thus, instead of trying to chase down the latest outrage to comment on until it cries ‘uncle,’ my thoughts turn to something more like a perennial topic:

How in the hell do the game broadcasts, across all sports and networks, manage to sync up the commercial breaks so perfectly?
Continue reading The Sports TV Mystery Machine

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The First Great Call Of The NFL Season

It seemed like a crazy thing when Tony Romo decided to bow out of the NFL and head into the broadcast booth. It seemed even crazier when CBS decided not only to hire Romo, but to also shove Phil Simms aside and install Romo next to the network’s no. 1 announcer Jim Nantz, thus making him the channel’s de facto top game analyst. No one has made a move like that since John Madden left the sidelines to jump into the broadcast booth–and even Madden needed a little seasoning before he became The Guy.

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Nantz, Wolfson, and newcomer Tony Romo: the new guy makes a great call

After Sunday’s season opener, none of it seems all that crazy anymore. Continue reading The First Great Call Of The NFL Season

The Bell Tolls In Bristol

If, at any time in the last several years, you invested heavily in ‘ESPN/schadenfreude’ futures, then last week was the moment when you became a very wealthy person.

I, of course, preferred to wait a decent period to comment on last week’s layoffs, out of respect for those…

Oh, who am I kidding? I was laughing my ass off over “The Worldwide Leader” and its problems. Not so much over the people laid off; most of them deserved better, I’m sure, and for the ones who were just doing the job of covering their beats–like Ed Werder or Ethan Sherwood Strauss–I have varying degrees of actual respect. They weren’t the ones who were creating the clown show; they just happened to be the ones who paid for it.

No, the main theme is a simple one: ESPN brought a lot of its woes upon itself–and if you tuned in to last night’s Sunday Night Baseball–while the ink on the pink slips was still not dry–you could see exactly why the network is having its problems.

Continue reading The Bell Tolls In Bristol