Tag Archives: losing

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Delayed-Action Predation

Preds fans had to wait until overtime to see their team take Game 1 on Friday night. No problem, really–they should be used to the waiting by now.


Good times keep coming for the Nashville Predators; maybe another team can learn something from them?

Not only did Nashville wait until OT against the Ducks, and the playoffs in general, to turn it on and start taking it out on other teams, but they’ve been running a slow burn towards success for years now. Though they may be a surprise team this postseason, you can’t say you didn’t see them coming, because The DFR made note of their development a couple of years ago–back when the idea of the Predators in the Conference Final seemed a tad premature.

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The Ships Be Sinkin’

Tall about sweet music.

I would like to take this opportunity to say “thank you” to the Utah Jazz for dispatching the Los Angeles Clippers in today’s game 7 of their playoff series.

This fit of gratefulness comes not so much because I have such a fondness for the Jazz; I don’t, though I certainly recognize that they are a team on the rise (assuming they can hold on to Gordon Hayward with a player option on his contract for next year). No, this is strictly about my gratitude that, for at least one more off-season, we won’t have to endure more of the Clippers. Continue reading The Ships Be Sinkin’

Divided And Conquered

Journalism. We’ve heard a lot about that lately.

I do not profess to be anything close to a professional journalist; as a blogger, I’m simply an untrained observer who happens to share some of those observations once in a while. But that doesn’t automatically mean I’m uninformed. Nor does it mean that I don’t follow certain practices of good journalism.


The VCU Rams: Getting along better than their old coach

For instance, there’s the “follow-up.” You report on something, then you go back a little later and see what progress–if any–has been made by the subject of that report.

For instance, a little over a year ago I commented upon Shaka Smart’s move from head coach of the men’s basketball team at Virginia Commonwealth–where he had had some notable success–to take the same position at the substantially higher profile University of Texas at Austin. I noted that the move, which many observers would have characterized as a “no-brainer,” carried with it a certain amount of risk. Thus, that story¬†would be a good candidate for one of those follow-ups. How has it gone for coach Smart down there “deep in the heart of”?

Say what? 11-22. Yeesh. And no NCAA Tournament bid this season, after bowing out last year in the first round? With what was arguably still Rick Barnes’ team? Hmmm. Sorry I asked.

Continue reading Divided And Conquered

Logo for the DFR Audible post categoryBye Curious

We’ve been hearing quite a bit of chatter about the NHL’s new policy of having teams have a “bye week” in the midst of their seasons, meaning they get a gift-wrapped and mandated five days off at some point in the schedule.

That “at some point” part of the equation seems to be the reason that many observers–Hockey Insider weighed in on the matter, as did NBC’s Pro Hockey Talk–have been grousing about what the layoff itself, as well as its inequitable distribution, has done to the principles of fair play. The bye is not popular with coaches, it turns out, and it seems to be putting teams at a disadvantage once they finally emerge from their enforced idleness.

Of course, it’s entirely possible that people are jumping to conclusions. ‘Seems,’ after all, is not always what it seems. Continue reading Bye Curious

The Head And The Heart, Olympics Edition

The Rio Olympics have now been in the rear-view mirror for over a week. That’s enough time to make an assessment–or, perhaps, a reassessment–of the Games from a dispassionate distance in time: still recent enough to have a clear remembrance of the event, but with enough days passed to gaze at the thing with a less biased eye.

Neymar and the Brazilian fans: a gold medal made of joy.

Certainly, going into the Games, I would have had to cop to a heavy bias against the Olympics–a position I made perfectly clear in my pre-event assessment in this space.

However, I did at a certain point overcome my skepticism enough to start watching some of the events. And in doing so, I found myself confronted again and again by the most powerful refutation of every damnation one can muster against the modern Olympic movement: joy.

Continue reading The Head And The Heart, Olympics Edition