Tag Archives: losing

Flying At Your Own Level

Last weekend I was able to watch the Academy Award winning documentary Icarus. Bryan Fogel’s filmic journey into the world of international athletic doping, from experimenting amateur cyclist all the way through to playing midwife to the exposé that led to Russian athletes being (conditionally) banned from the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, is either shocking or business as usual, depending upon your level of sports cynicism going into the viewing.

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Jasmin Bambur of United States during the Alpine Skiing – Men’s Super-G, Sitting at PyeongChang: an antidote to Icarus?

It so happened that, after finishing the movie and turning back over from Netflix to regular broadcast programming, I stumbled upon NBCSN’s coverage of the Winter Paralympics, also coming to you from PyeongChang, South Korea. I caught a showing of the men’s Super-G competitions, both standing and seated, and if it wasn’t quite as spectacular a show as the regular Olympics alpine events, it was at least athletes in competition and striving towards being the best.

The juxtaposition of those two programs I watched, the scandals of Icarus and the Paralympic competition, coming one right after the other, suggested a bigger picture, and perhaps the possibility that the one event provided the correct answer to the other.

Continue reading Flying At Your Own Level


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Cue The Tom Petty Song

Do you remember when the Los Angeles Dodgers were the greatest team in the history of Earth?

No? Well, you may not be alone–the Dodgers themselves may feel like those days are so far in the past that they’re wondering if any of that was real.

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Yasiel Puig and the Dodgers: kissing their dominance goodbye?

The presumptive National League champs–so anointed back in mid-August, especially so after they acquired Yu Darvish–have lost 9 of 10, including waxings by the playoff-bound Arizona Diamondbacks and the extremely also-ran San Diego Padres. As Tom Petty once put it in his ode to the San Fernando Valley–Dodgers territory, for sure–L.A’s team is free fallin’–and it’s debatable whether or not they will be able to get back up.  Continue reading Cue The Tom Petty Song

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Delayed-Action Predation

Preds fans had to wait until overtime to see their team take Game 1 on Friday night. No problem, really–they should be used to the waiting by now.

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Good times keep coming for the Nashville Predators; maybe another team can learn something from them?

Not only did Nashville wait until OT against the Ducks, and the playoffs in general, to turn it on and start taking it out on other teams, but they’ve been running a slow burn towards success for years now. Though they may be a surprise team this postseason, you can’t say you didn’t see them coming, because The DFR made note of their development a couple of years ago–back when the idea of the Predators in the Conference Final seemed a tad premature.

Continue reading Delayed-Action Predation

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The Ships Be Sinkin’

Tall about sweet music.

I would like to take this opportunity to say “thank you” to the Utah Jazz for dispatching the Los Angeles Clippers in today’s game 7 of their playoff series.

This fit of gratefulness comes not so much because I have such a fondness for the Jazz; I don’t, though I certainly recognize that they are a team on the rise (assuming they can hold on to Gordon Hayward with a player option on his contract for next year). No, this is strictly about my gratitude that, for at least one more off-season, we won’t have to endure more of the Clippers. Continue reading The Ships Be Sinkin’

Divided And Conquered

Journalism. We’ve heard a lot about that lately.

I do not profess to be anything close to a professional journalist; as a blogger, I’m simply an untrained observer who happens to share some of those observations once in a while. But that doesn’t automatically mean I’m uninformed. Nor does it mean that I don’t follow certain practices of good journalism.

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The VCU Rams: Getting along better than their old coach

For instance, there’s the “follow-up.” You report on something, then you go back a little later and see what progress–if any–has been made by the subject of that report.

For instance, a little over a year ago I commented upon Shaka Smart’s move from head coach of the men’s basketball team at Virginia Commonwealth–where he had had some notable success–to take the same position at the substantially higher profile University of Texas at Austin. I noted that the move, which many observers would have characterized as a “no-brainer,” carried with it a certain amount of risk. Thus, that story would be a good candidate for one of those follow-ups. How has it gone for coach Smart down there “deep in the heart of”?

Say what? 11-22. Yeesh. And no NCAA Tournament bid this season, after bowing out last year in the first round? With what was arguably still Rick Barnes’ team? Hmmm. Sorry I asked.

Continue reading Divided And Conquered