All posts by Stephen Taylor

About Stephen Taylor

Stephen Taylor is a writer and graphic artist living in the San Francisco Bay Area. In addition to publishing The Disgruntled Fan Report, Stephen also has an eclectic list of writing credits, including Chicken Soup for the Soul, The Baseball Research Journal, and Watching Backyard Birds. As a graphic artist, he has worked for newspapers (several local to the Bay Area), magazines, direct mail advertising companies, and large corporate brands including Ubisoft and The Body Shop. He spends his time bicycling (when the weather's good), watching a lot of sports, doing a little reading, and tending to his other obsession, cats (as a cat sitter and as a volunteer at a local animal shelter).

The SkyCam Sham

Last night’s telecast of Thursday Night Football featured the presumed innovation of showing the majority of the game from the SkyCam angle. With a few exceptions, most of the plays were shot from the perspective of the camera floating above the field on a couple of wires.

This was supposed to be a good idea.

So how’d it go? Admittedly, I only watched brief stretches of the game–there was a Dubs game on last night, plus, seriously, who wanted to look at a Broncos-Colts match?–but I saw enough to form something of an intelligent opinion.

The early returns are not encouraging. Continue reading The SkyCam Sham

Advertisements

The Mystery Of NBA’s Arc

Why are there two three-point lines on an NBA half-court?

We tend to think of the three point arc on an NBA basketball court as one continuous line, but in fact that’s not true. There actually are three separate but joined lines that define three-point distance in an NBA game: there’s the actual arc that curves 23 feet and 9 inches away from the center of the basket, and then there’s the straight 22-foot lines that parallel the sidelines on each side of the width of the court. All those lines join at a couple of soft corners to form one continuous stripe that defines three-point range.

OK, that’s all easy to understand; it’s even easier to visualize when looking at the court versus describing it. (You can see all of this laid out in the diagram available at this site.)

What’s not easy to understand, if you pause to think about it, is why that’s supposed to make sense.

Continue reading The Mystery Of NBA’s Arc

Monday Spites Football

It’s halftime of the Kings-Warriors game as I write this. Tonight’s Dubs game represents the fourth out of the last five Mondays to see the defending NBA champions play a game. The three most recent of those games were home games for the Warriors, meaning they had at least some say in the scheduling of those games; start times for sure, if not the actual dates.

A quick look forward at the schedule shows that the Warriors will also be playing each of the next four Mondays; that is to say, each Monday in December, including the Christmas day matchup against the Cavaliers. That means the team will be playing on all but one Monday in November and December.

So what? So this: the Warriors, and a lot of other teams in leagues other than the NFL, almost never used to play on Monday nights in November and December. This scheduling intrusion indicates that the assault on the NFL’s elevated status continues apace. It means, quite simply, that no one is afraid of the NFL anymore. Continue reading Monday Spites Football

The Sports TV Mystery Machine

The DFR has been on a bit of an Extendo-Break lately–maybe more like an Extendo-Nap, to be honest–so I’ve been letting any number of things that have been percolating through the sports world slide on past without comment.

 

Thus, instead of trying to chase down the latest outrage to comment on until it cries ‘uncle,’ my thoughts turn to something more like a perennial topic:

How in the hell do the game broadcasts, across all sports and networks, manage to sync up the commercial breaks so perfectly?
Continue reading The Sports TV Mystery Machine